CK Contemporary

Now Representing the Estate of Jack Wolfe (1924 – 2007)

CK Contemporary is honored to announce its exclusive representation of the estate of  Jack Wolfe. Wolfe (1924 – 2007) was a pioneering American artist who consistently created bold, passionate, and expressive artwork.  Art History’s standard narrative often excludes purists and separatists who were unwilling or unable to navigate the priorities of the commercial market, and in the case of Jack Wolfe, it doesn’t fully acknowledge an artist who had a different concept of success. CK Contemporary is working directly with the Wolfe estate to help bring this artist’s significant legacy back to light. We feel that it is our duty to tell the story of Jack Wolfe and advocate for the scholarship and attention his artwork deserves. In October, 2021, CK Contemporary will be presenting the first major retrospective of Jack Wolfe’s paintings since his death.

Wolfe is commonly associated with the Boston Expressionists, however his varied body of work does not neatly fit into a single category. He combines cubist, abstract expressionist, and hard-edge techniques with rich colors and an acute sense for emotional pitch. Wolfe earned early recognition, and in the 1950s, was included in several group and solo museum exhibitions, with work on display alongside artists such as Pollock, Calder, and Frankenthaler. With his artwork added to the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, and the deCordova Museum, Wolfe was poised to become a successful mainstay of the New York art scene. However, after only four months there, Wolfe became disillusioned with an overtly commercial “art system” to which he was unwilling to bend his creative vision. He returned to Massachusetts, cleared land in rural Stoughton and built a home and studio where he began his lifelong commitment to creating a significant body of work, consisting of expressive and compelling abstractions, emotionally charged portraits and powerful political paintings. 

Although he refused to pursue a traditional version of fame, Wolfe’s artwork remains a salient reminder of his unique ability to transform a canvas into a magnificent new universe. As Wolfe said himself, “It is the quality of adventure that delights me about painting. When I was a little boy, I wanted to be an explorer, and when you are faced with a canvas six feet by eight feet, the possibilities for discovering are so great. This is an infinite expanse.” 

Allegheny Mantra, 1977, Acrylic on canvas, 72 x 72 inches
Arctic, 1971, Acrylic on canvas, 104 x 59 inches
Robin’s Rock, 1962, Oil on canvas, 78 x 78 inches
Lowell’s Yellow, 1962, Oil on canvas, 40 x 50 inches
Logo Rondo 1, c. 1999, Acrylic on canvas, 30 x 30 inches

1 thought on “Now Representing the Estate of Jack Wolfe (1924 – 2007)”

  1. Derek Matthew Thurber

    Jack Wolfe’s paintings are a legacy for all people. They teach us about how we can create a more human future.
    Wolfe belongs in all the top museums of the world. When will this painter’s genius be fully “discovered”?

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